Photoville!

A quick reminder that today is the last day of Photoville! Photoville has marked my two favorite weeks of the year for the seventh year in a row now. Organized by United Photo Industries in Dumbo, Brooklyn, Photoville presents work by more than 600 artists in 90 photography exhibitions and outdoor installations open to the public for two weeks each September in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Exhibitions are set up in and around repurposed shipping containers.

In addition to the exhibitions, Photoville offers panel discussions (“Talks”), artist lectures, professional development seminars, hands-on workshops and nighttime programming. Panelists in the Photoville Talks come from diverse photographic practices and discuss photography’s intersection with social impact, activism and spirituality. I am lucky enough to live in Brooklyn where Photoville takes place, and enjoyed attending a number of panels relevant to the intersection of photography and social justice - including “Connecting with Culture: A Conversation with Miranda Barnes and Stella Johnson” and “How Do We Focus Our Gaze? Connecting Photography & Social Impact.” These extraordinary panel discussions will be available on the Photoville website in coming months!

I’ve posted a couple of highlight photos below. Photoville is open until 9PM tonight - don’t miss it!

 
  Makeba Rainey’s “Soul(s) of…” project “archives people’s histories as the landscapes of their neighborhoods change so their stories and the culture they create may never be forgotten. The two components of this project include 16-20 digital collage portraits of Black women living in gentrified communities, and an interactive online archive of their stories.” Rainey is a Harlem native inspired by her community and fellow emerging visual and performance artists.

Makeba Rainey’s “Soul(s) of…” project “archives people’s histories as the landscapes of their neighborhoods change so their stories and the culture they create may never be forgotten. The two components of this project include 16-20 digital collage portraits of Black women living in gentrified communities, and an interactive online archive of their stories.” Rainey is a Harlem native inspired by her community and fellow emerging visual and performance artists.

  At Friday’s nighttime event in the Photoville beer garden, Getty Images Special Correspondent John Moore talked about his experiences documnenting U.S. immigration and border enforcement for a decade. The screen displays a well-known image taken by John of a crying 2-year-old girl who looked on as her mother was searched by U.S. Border Patrol agents in a part of the Rio Grande Valley called El Rincon.

At Friday’s nighttime event in the Photoville beer garden, Getty Images Special Correspondent John Moore talked about his experiences documnenting U.S. immigration and border enforcement for a decade. The screen displays a well-known image taken by John of a crying 2-year-old girl who looked on as her mother was searched by U.S. Border Patrol agents in a part of the Rio Grande Valley called El Rincon.