JR Exhibit at Perrotin, NYC

There are just a few more days to check out the solo show of French artist JR at Perrotin Gallery in the Lower East Side (NYC)! The two-floor exhibition is closing this Friday, August 17. 

JR, a French artist, applies the wheat pasting street art technique to massive printed photographs, pasting them on public locations like walls, bridges and rooftops. Having risen to international acclaim when he won the coveted TED Prize for his socially active art in 2011, his projects often have a social justice intention.

At Perrotin, the issue of immigration is a major focus of the exhibition. Photographs, as well as a short film, are included that were taken of his project on the U.S.-Mexico border in 2017. JR constructed a billboard-sized portrait of a baby boy, Pedro, peering over the American border from Mexico (see photos below). On the final day of the installation, JR threw a picnic on an extended tablecloth printed with his signature eyes that traversed both sides of the border (one eye on the Mexico side, the other eye on the U.S. side) to symbolize that the world was watching. People on both sides of the border shared a meal together. 

For more information, check out the press release and exhibition write-up

 
 Photograph at Perrotin Gallery (NYC) of JR's installation at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2017. People from Mexico and the U.S. share a meal at the border.

Photograph at Perrotin Gallery (NYC) of JR's installation at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2017. People from Mexico and the U.S. share a meal at the border.

 Photograph captured of a short film at Perrotin Gallery (NYC) about JR's installation at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2017. A baby boy peers over the American border from Mexico.

Photograph captured of a short film at Perrotin Gallery (NYC) about JR's installation at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2017. A baby boy peers over the American border from Mexico.

 

 

Bronx Documentary Center Exhibit Closing on Friday

Just a quick reminder to New Yorkers that the Bronx Documentary Center’s current exhibit, “Attacks on the Press: Mexico” will only be up for another couple of days! The exhibit, featuring work by Félix Marquez, Emmanuel Guillén Lozano, Francisco Robles, Mauricio Palos and Article 19, closes this Friday, August 3. The exhibition examines attacks on the press throughout Mexico, which have become commonplace in the country:

“In recent years Mexico has become one of the most dangerous places in the world for journalists with levels of violence unmatched by any country in the Western Hemisphere. Attacks and threats against journalists and photojournalists are a daily occurrence; assassinations are routine. In the past seven years, the Committee to Protect Journalists has documented over 50 Mexican journalists killed or disappeared; The Guardian newspaper puts the number at 100 killed in the past decade. 2017 was the deadliest year on record, with drug cartels and organized crime killing with impunity; 2018 is on course to be nearly as deadly. In some Mexican states, government officials are involved in intimidation and violence against journalists investigating official corruption. Ninety-eight percent of all killings in Mexico go unsolved….” - Bronx Documentary Center

Not only is the exhibition something you want to see, but the Bronx Documentary Center is well worth a visit. The BDC is a non-profit gallery focusing on justice, education, community-building and positive social change. They provide free education programs for middle and high school students and for adults interested in photography. It’s also physically a super cool space, as it’s housed in a Victorian building in the Bronx (at 614 Courtlandt Avenue) constructed in the 1870s! 

For more information, visit https://www.bronxdoc.org/exhibits/attacks-on-the-press-mexico/detail.

 
  Source: Bronx Documentary Center, https://www.bronxdoc.org/exhibits/attacks-on-the-press-mexico/detail

Source: Bronx Documentary Center, https://www.bronxdoc.org/exhibits/attacks-on-the-press-mexico/detail

 

 

 

 

New Prints by Marco Giusfredi

We are beyond excited to add to our gallery the work of Marco Giusfredi, an Italian street photographer living and working in Paris. Marco is a member of the Spontanea Collective and the @fragmentphotocollective. For more information on his work and more insight about what draws him to street photography, check out his website, Instagram or various interviews of him online. A couple of ones I enjoyed reading:

Streetphotographyintheworld.com Interview: When asked, "What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?," he says "The street is the adventure. The people are the players." 

Streetcorephotography.com Profile: He says, "I like walking the street observing the world around me. With a camera it becomes a discipline. It sharpens your eye. And if you are concentrated enough you can forget about yourself, which is always good. What I like most in SP is that you cannot control much, maybe you can control nothing at all." This profile also provides more information on his process. 

Check out his prints at the links below!

 "Untitled," ©Marco Giusfredi. Available as a  print .

"Untitled," ©Marco Giusfredi. Available as a print.

 "Untitled," ©Marco Giusfredi.Available as a  print  and as a  card .

"Untitled," ©Marco Giusfredi.Available as a print and as a card.

 

Moving Walls Exhibition - Only Three Days Left!

There are just a few days left to visit the 24th “Moving Walls” exhibition in NYC - I hope you find some time to check it out! It closes this Friday, July 20.

Moving Walls is an annual documentary photography exhibition produced by the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project and exhibited at the OSF offices. Since 1998, the "Moving Walls" exhibition series has showcased nearly 200 photographers in 24 group exhibitions that align with the Open Society Foundations’ mission to advance human rights and social justice. 

The current exhibition, “Here We Are: Visual Resistance and Reclaiming Narratives,” has been open free of charge to the public at the Open Society Foundations' New York office (224 West 57th Street at Broadway) since last October and will be closing this Friday. The nine artists, journalists, documentarians, and advocates in the exhibit “engage with art and documentary practice as forms of resistance within the context of race, religion, sexuality, political and economic repression, and colonial history.” They are: Xyza Cruz Bacani, Endia Beal, Rahima Gambo, Eric Gyamfi, Stephanie Mercedes, Reentry Think Tank, Ruddy Roye, Dread Scott and Daniella Zalcman. 

I have included photographs below from three of the bodies of work featured in the exhibition (more information in captions). I hope you get a chance to check it out if you live in the New York City area - the exhibition is extremely moving and thought-provoking.

 
 “Just Like Us” by Eric Gyamfi, exploring queer life in Ghana. The photographs attempt “to represent queer people in Ghana as both members of a distinct community as well as critical contributors to the country’s social fabric and history.”

“Just Like Us” by Eric Gyamfi, exploring queer life in Ghana. The photographs attempt “to represent queer people in Ghana as both members of a distinct community as well as critical contributors to the country’s social fabric and history.”

 “I AM, We the People” by Reentry Think Tank, which works to transform the stigma surrounding previously incarcerated individuals.   

“I AM, We the People” by Reentry Think Tank, which works to transform the stigma surrounding previously incarcerated individuals. 
 

 Copies of two of the (free!) exhibition books. 

Copies of two of the (free!) exhibition books. 



 

"Capture Your Freedom" Photo Exhibit Through July 1

I am honored to be a part of United Photo Industries’ “Capture Your Freedom” exhibit currently on display at Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island in New York City. The exhibit features photographic series by almost 30 photographers, each focused on one of the “Four Freedoms” (from FDR’s pivotal 1941 address): Freedom of Speech and Expression, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want and Freedom from Fear.

Selected to be part of the Freedom From Fear category, my “Fade to Black” series intends to inspire discourse and promote action around the gun violence crisis in the United States. The project is a series of 60+ photographs taken at the sites of fatal shootings in Brooklyn, New York during the last two years. I used video footage, news article descriptions, photographs and geocodes to determine as precisely as I could (exact or within steps of) the location of each shooting. Rather than pointing the camera at the crime scene, the photographs were taken from the vantage point of the victims so as to ask viewers to put themselves “in the shoes” of the victims and imagine what the experience of their final moments might have been. 

Too often, we are not exposed to the violence that is happening every day in our very own neighborhoods, as media coverage is less robust than it is after, for example, mass shootings. Yet approximately 96 people die on average from guns each day in the US. These photographs are intended in no way to blame the shooters or implicate the victims. Gun control is all of our problem as U.S. citizens, and something we need to solve together. In the context of envisioning a world without fear, “Fade to Black” aims to raise awareness and move viewers to take action - such as to advocate for stricter federal gun control laws - to eliminate the fear and destruction that guns bring into our communities.

Other photographs in the exhibit focus on, for example, formerly incarcerated women (Sara Bennett’s “Life After Life in Prison: The Bedroom Project”), immigration detention for asylum seekers in the United States (“Immigrant Detention” by Ed Kashi), and urban planning and the concept of experiencing a national ideal through the built environment (“Freedom From Want” by Ryan Koopmans). If you live in the New York City area or are planning to visit before July 1 when the exhibit closes, I highly recommend you check out the exhibit! 

 
Four Freedoms 1.jpg
Four Freedoms 2.jpg
 

Aaaand we're back!

Here at Picture A Healthier World, we are constantly thinking of ways to improve the project so that it is as effective as possible in supporting our two-pronged mission to provide positive exposure for artists while supporting urgently needed health services around the world. Since our relaunch in January, we have received valuable feedback from a multitude of artists, shoppers, website visitors and other interested parties around ways that the project can be enhanced to better support our mission.

Following these conversations, our site was briefly “under construction” so that we could take time to do the research we needed to offer you a more effective platform. We are introducing a reconfigured project of which the primary focus is the sale of greeting cards that promote the artist’s visibility. To that end, the back of each card features the artist’s name, website and social media information (ex. Instagram handle). That way, both the shopper and card recipient become potential patrons of the artist and can reach out directly to artists to inquire about their work.

We still offer the option for artists to sell their cards in print format as well, and have changed the pricing structure so that artists are now compensated for print sales. After accounting for materials and labor costs, half (50%) of profits are donated, and the remaining amount is divided between the artist (35%) and PAHW (15%) . PAHW retains 15% of profits to cover operations and administration expenses, which include but are not limited to website development and management, website hosting and subscription fees, labor costs, customer relations and marketing to grown the project. 

We hope that this next iteration of the project helps us drive even more support towards global health and human rights initiatives! We look forward to hearing your continued feedback about the project. Please don’t hesitate to contact us directly. As always, thank you for your continued interest and support. 

NOTE: The website's Terms of Use and Submission License Agreement have been updated with these changes to the project. Please visit each page to review the site's new policies.

 "Cover Up" by ©Fidel Iranzo. 

"Cover Up" by ©Fidel Iranzo. 

 

Today is World Malaria Day

Today is World Malaria Day (and the 70th anniversary of the World Health Organization!). When shoppers add an item to their shopping carts, they currently have the option to choose to support malaria prevention by providing malaria prevention pills to children in communities facing the deadly disease. (Please note: the health and human rights initiatives supported by Picture A Healthier World are subject to change based on changes in the projects led by the organizations we support).

Visit the WHO’s website for a series of interviews with leaders involved in the malaria response - including Bill Gates - as they reflect on the fight against the disease that claims 445,000 lives each year. Also check out the statement by WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, detailing the critical need to ensure that no one is left behind in accessing life-saving services to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease. 

 

Featured Photo: "Baby Elephant" by Rachel Bradley

 "Baby Elephant" by Rachel Bradley. Photo Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand.

"Baby Elephant" by Rachel Bradley. Photo Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand.

I wanted to share this photograph today with hopes that it makes you smile as much as it makes me smile! This photograph can be purchased as a print or greeting card. It makes a great gift for a loved one. As a result of sales of this photograph on the PAHW website: 

30 children were provided with deworming tablets to prevent intestinal worm infection and the malnutrition, growth stunting and cognitive deficits that can result from infection.
1 child was provided with a mosquito net to prevent malaria.
1,057 gallons of water were purified to stop the spread of deadly water-borne diseases like cholera and typhoid.
 

 

Happy Valentine's Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day from Picture A Healthier World!

If you live in New York City, a great way to celebrate the week of Valentine's Day is a visit to the Steven Kasher Gallery on West 26th Street to view the first ever exhibition of photography by renowned writer Bill Hayes, entitled "How New York Breaks Your Heart." 

I just popped into the gallery thinking the exhibit opened today, and the gallerist kindly let me take a sneak peek even though the exhibition doesn't open until tomorrow. The exhibition (through March 17) is a “love letter to New York City,” featuring 24 black and white and color portraits of New Yorkers. PowerHouse Books in Dumbo will be having a book launch on February 22, featuring Bill Hayes in conversation with Vince Aletti.

IMG_0065.JPG
 

PAHW's Sales Support Malaria: A Brief Overview of the Disease

When shoppers purchase a photograph in our gallery, they currently have the option of supporting three health and human rights initiatives: malaria prevention, clean water and art therapy. (Please note: the health and human rights initiatives supported by Picture A Healthier World are subject to change based on changes in the projects led by the organizations we support).Al Jazeera’s recent video provides a nice overview of the status of the malaria crisis today, and what needs to be done to prevent the mosquito-borne disease from ravaging communities, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa where 90% of malaria deaths occur. 

About 3.2 billion people – almost half of the world’s population – are at risk of malaria. Malaria is caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. Each year, there are over 200 million cases of malaria, and an estimated 429,000 deaths. Children under age five are particularly susceptible to infection, illness and death from malaria. Additionally, malaria infection during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight among newborn infants — one of the leading risk factors for infant mortality and sub-optimal growth and development. As a result, malaria has serious economic impacts in Africa, slowing economic development and perpetuating the cycle of poverty. Malaria is a disease of poverty, afflicting primarily those living in malaria-prone rural areas in poorly-constructed dwellings that offer inadequate barriers against mosquitoes.

Yet malaria can be prevented by sleeping under insecticide-treated nets, residual spraying and administering anti-malarial drugs. As a result of these strategies, global malaria cases declined steadily between 2010 (237 million cases) and 2015 (211 million cases). However, according to The World Malaria Report 2017 published by the World Health Organization, progress in the fight against malaria has stalled because funding has plateaued. In 2016, the number of cases increased significantly to 216 million. 

By selecting "Malaria Prevention Pills" when you add an item on our site to your cart, up to 896 tablets of anti-malarial drugs will be administered to children in malaria-prone communities. Read more about how your purchase can support malaria prevention by visiting our FAQs page.

 

Hello, New Website!

Picture A Healthier World (PAHW) is back up and running! Over the past year, we worked hard to reevaluate and restructure the project so that it is as effective as possible in its mission to sell art to raise funds for global health needs. We are so pleased to introduce you to our new and improved website. Some of the new features we would like to highlight include:

  • Underneath each individual image, you can now view the health services that have been supported by sales of each photograph (ex. “1,057 gallons of water were purified to stop the spread of deadly water-borne diseases like cholera and typhoid”);
  • When you make a purchase, shoppers have the option to “thank the artist” for their new photograph; and
  • Shoppers can also select at check-out which of three initiatives - clean water, malaria prevention or arts programming for youth who have experienced trauma - to support with their purchase. (Please note: the health and human rights initiatives supported by Picture A Healthier World are subject to change based on changes in the projects led by the organizations we support).


With the relaunch of the site, the selection of photographs in the Picture A Healthier World gallery has been refined and thoughtfully curated to include only images that adhere to the highest technical standards and align with our creative vision. Upon re-examining all photographs, we regret that we were unable to retain a large portion of the images that had been submitted to the project. Reasons for not retaining an image include too small file size for printing, blurriness or uneven sharpness in the focus area, insufficient lighting or the image is “noisy” (has faint white speckles). 

We hope you enjoy the features of the new website, and that you continue to stay updated by following us on social media (Instagram, Facebook and Flickr) and visiting us here on our News page, where we will post regular updates on the Picture A Healthier World project as well as on trends and events relating to photography and global health. This page is designed to be a community-oriented page where you can share your thoughts and connect with others. We welcome you to submit a post for our News page via the contact form

We wish you a wonderful start to your new year, and we thank you for your shared vision of a healthier world!

NOTE: The website's Privacy Policy, Terms of Use and Submission License Agreement have all been updated with the relaunch of the site. Please visit each page to review the site's new policies.